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(Instant) Pot Heads Anonymous - Instant Pot Discussion Thread


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#1 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 28, 2017 - 10:41 am

Let's discuss the popularity, sales, recipes, decals, learning curve, and companies technical support of the Instant Pot and other electric pressure cookers.

Hello, I'm Pam and I'm an Instant Pot Head.

I bought my first Instant Pot, the 6-quart Duo model, during Amazon's Black Friday sale last year, and instantly fell in love. I use it easily twice a week. A few months later I bought a second insert, this time the ceramic coated aluminum one, as I wanted to still be able to use the pot while I had homemade yogurt chilling in the original stainless steel insert. I originally bought the ceramic lined insert because it was less expensive, but have found I prefer the nonstick coating for dishes such as Creamy Chicken Marsala Pasta and Mac and Cheese.

And yet, that still wasn't enough, so I got the 6-quart Ultra a couple of months ago. Just having the Duo occupied for the 10 hours while my yogurt incubates makes me antsy, so a second pot was needed.

I'm now highly tempted to get the 3-quart Duo mini to use for side dishes and more desserts, but I really have no room for another unit. So I am doing my best to refrain.

It's an addiction, I tell you!

I initially bought a Power Pressure Cooker XL, but never even opened it. I know many people who love it, and I would love to hear of successes made with it. But I wanted the ease of having the Yogurt button on the Instant Pot, and I like the stainless steel liner.

#2 Brad  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 29, 2017 - 8:24 am

Which specific model would you recommend to most people? Or does it depend on family/food size, etc?



#3 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 29, 2017 - 1:25 pm

Most of the recipes found online are written for the Duo60 v.2. This is a 6-quart model.

I usually cook for four adults, and find this to be large enough for us for dinner and leftovers, enough for a second full meal.

This said, the recipes are easily adapted to other versions of the Duo, and also to the Ultra. The 8-quart Duo can cook recipes written for the 6-quart, but can also be used to increase amounts as well.

I, personally, do not recommend the Lux model. It does not have adjustable pressure settings, nor does it have a programmed yogurt settiing. Even if you never plan to make yogurt, that setting can also be used to proof dough or start bean sprouts. Plus, many times you can find the 6-quart Duo on sale for the same price or lower than the Lux.

I am still tempted by the DuoMini, especially since it is on sale on amazon today. This is a good size for students, singles, and couples. I have heard several people use it in their RVs. It is ideal for a second pot to do side dishes and desserts in.

I'm posting from my phone, and do not see the icon to enable me to paste the link to the DuoMini on sale at amazon, even though I'm in the full site version. Perhaps Brad can add the link for me.

#4 Brad  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 29, 2017 - 3:47 pm

I'm posting from my phone, and do not see the icon to enable me to paste the link to the DuoMini on sale at amazon, even though I'm in the full site version. Perhaps Brad can add the link for me.

http://www.amazon.co...ASIN=B06Y1YD5W7

Thought about ordering one of these myself but the possibility of better deals next month is making me wait...

#5 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 29, 2017 - 4:37 pm

Agree, although this is the first I've seen the DuoMini on sale. I have no idea if it will be included in Black Friday deals.

How many are you cooking for, Brad? I usually recommend the 6-quart for families, since most of the recipes are written for the 6-quart models.

#6 queenkishaa  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 30, 2017 - 8:16 pm

I have been looking at these also. I think the DUO60 6 Qt is enough for a family of 4 but still unsure. I'm trying to hold out until the rest of the ads come out but it doesn't look like it will go lower than $80.

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#7 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Oct 30, 2017 - 9:47 pm

As I said above, I find most recipes for the 6-quart make enough for dinner for a family of four adults, with leftovers for lunch or another dinner. I also feel many recipes can be doubled in the 6-quart successfully, although most soups or stew recipes tend to be written for the maximum amount that should be made in that size pot. But I have successfully doubled recipes such as chicken marsala in the 6-quart.

That said, you can always make less in an 8-quart, but if you want to do even more than doubling a recipe in a 6-quart, you will be limited by size.

Some people have been posting about practicing cooking their turkeys in the IP. One poster claims she was able to get a 10 lb bird in her 6-quart. I'll admit I'm skeptical, but she did post pictures. And I have done 6 lb chickens with plenty of room, so...

#8 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 3, 2017 - 11:51 am

Yesterday was a cool and dreary day here in the Pacific Northwet. And then I awoke to a light dusting of snow this morning!

Anyway, the weather prompted a craving for a summer meal. So, baby back ribs it was.

I know, I know, nothing beats ribs cooked low and slow in a smoker. This GRITS will not argue with anyone about that. But when it is wet and dreary, as well as cool, I'm just not hardy enough to spend hours by the smoker. So, Instant Pot to the rescue!

I put together my list and finished shopping at 2:00 pm. The first thing I did was put together my coleslaw, so it could macerate for several hours.

Attached File  coleslaw prep.jpg   107.98KB   14 downloads
I use a shredded coleslaw package, but make my own dressing from mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar, Gulden's, sugar, celery seed, and salt & pepper.

Attached File  coleslaw mixed.jpg   121.81KB   14 downloads
Here it is mixed and ready to sit for several hours in the fridge.

I decided to go with a Kansas City-style dry rub. At least, that's what the recipe said it was.

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This contained brown sugar, smoked paprika, granulated garlic, granulated onion, salt, and pepper.

Attached File  baby back plain.jpg   181.41KB   13 downloads
I usually go with St. Louis-style ribs, but Fred Meyer had baby backs on sale for $1.99/lb, so I went with that. As you'll see, I should have adjusted my time at pressure, but live and learn.

Most IP recipes for ribs tell you to remove the membrane on the back, but I like a little chew to my ribs, so I generally leave it attached.

Attached File  baby back back rub.jpg   132.53KB   12 downloads
I started by adding the dry rub to the back of the ribs first. I'm one who believes you coat heavily to ribs patted dry, but you don't actually rub or massage the rub in. Whatever sticks is the proper amount of rub.

Attached File  baby back dry rub.jpg   316.78KB   12 downloads
I then flipped the rack over and did the same to the front.

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Placed in a food storage container and in to the fridge for several hours.

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Dinner was planned for 8:00, so time to start cooking.

Attached File  baby back macerated.jpg   318.84KB   12 downloads
The ribs look great after sitting for awhile.

Attached File  rib ingredients.jpg   190.92KB   10 downloads
For the steaming liquid to bring the pot to pressure, I use a cup of apple cider, a half of a cup of apple cider vinegar, and a splash of liquid smoke.

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Put the liquids in to the bottom of the stainless steel insert, place the trivet which comes with the pot in the bottom, and coil the ribs so they stand on their side on the trivet. I have done as many as three 3 lb. racks at a time totaling a little over 9 lbs., when guests have come over.

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This is the Duo60 v. 2 6-quart model. When first put on, it says On while the pot pressurizes. Once the pin in the lid pops up, it continues to say On for a few more minutes, until pressure is fully reached.

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Here is the lid of the Duo model at pressure. See how the pin is flush with the lid? This activates a locking mechanism so the pot can not be opened until all of the pressure releases.

While the ribs cooked, it was time to prep the corn. In season, there is nothing better than corn on the cob roasted in their husks for an hour in the oven at 375F, rotating the ears every 20 minutes for an even cook. But, in early November, those ears need some help. Bring on my other IP.

Attached File  corn ingredients.jpg   118.21KB   10 downloads
A little moisture and sweetness needs to be added to the corn, so milk, half and half for richness, sugar for sweetness, butter, and some salt are all used.

Attached File  corn in pot.jpg   119.23KB   10 downloads
We want the corn to be saturated with the cooking liquid, so the trivet is not used. Everything goes in to the bottom of the insert. I should have used my extra ceramic lined insert, as the steamed dairy stuck to the insert a little at clean up, but it wasn't too difficult to clean.

Attached File  corn pot on.jpg   86.47KB   10 downloads
This is the IP 6-quart Ultra model. Isn't it pretty?
Like the Duo, the pot first displays On while coming to pressure. But the Ultra has a little graph at the bottom of the display which shows where the pot is in the cooking cycle. As it is pressurizing, it shows preheating.

Attached File  corn pot at pressure.jpg   110KB   10 downloads
The pin on the Ultra pops up beyond the lid when at pressure. The pot still needs a few minutes to come to full pressure before the countdown begins.

Attached File  corn pot cooking.jpg   102.95KB   9 downloads
Once the pot is fully ar pressure, the countdown begins and the graph shows cooking. Vegetables cook very quickly in the IP, so for corn only a minute at pressure is needed or they turn to mush.

Attached File  corn pot keep warm.jpg   114.27KB   8 downloads
Once the minute is up, the pot switches in to a keep warm mode, although the warm temperature itself does not kick o until the pot is depressurized. The graph will show keep warm, and the pot starts counting up instead of down.

Attached File  corn pot pin drop.jpg   127.88KB   8 downloads
When all of the pressure is released, the pin drops. On the Ultra, it is flush with the lid.

Attached File  corn pot depressurized.jpg   91.84KB   8 downloads
The corn needed to sit in the sweet cooking liquid to absorb some of the flavors, so I let the pressure release naturally, rather than manually forcing the pressure out. Since it wasn't all that full, it took 10 minutes.

Time to return to the ribs.

Attached File  rib pot pin drop.jpg   104.26KB   9 downloads
Most recipes call for cooking St. Louis-style ribs for 25 to 30 minutes. As I said earlier, I like a little chew to my ribs, so I only do them for 15. Not having done baby backs I the IP before I also cooked them for 15 minutes; I should have gone for only 10 minutes, or possible even less.

Anyway, after cooking at pressure for 15 minutes, I allowed the pressure to release naturally. I tend to do tis with all meat. It is similar to a resting period after grilling the meat; force the pressure out and the meat turns out dryer than I like.

Once all of the pressure releases, the pin drops. Notice how on the Duo the pin drops below the lid, unlike the Ultra.

Attached File  rib pot depressurized.jpg   144.14KB   10 downloads
The pot took longer to depressurize than the one with corn, since it had more food in it.

Attached File  rib coil cooked.jpg   186.23KB   10 downloads
Here are the ribs fully cooked. Now is the time for saucing.

Attached File  ribs on pan.jpg   172.58KB   10 downloads
I lined a broiler pan with foil and laid the rack on it. I was able to tell immediately they were cooked too much for my liking, as the rack split in half and the bones were sliding right out. They were still yummy, though.

Attached File  ribs with sauce back.jpg   224.95KB   10 downloads
I really like Sweet Baby Ray's, so that is what I used.

Attached File  ribs broiled back.jpg   346.36KB   9 downloads
Five minutes under the broiler for the back.

Attached File  ribs front sauced.jpg   272.56KB   10 downloads
Flip the rack, sauce the front. Another five minutes under the broiler.

Attached File  ribs sliced.jpg   173.4KB   11 downloads
Transfer to the serving board and slice them up.

Back to the corn.

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Presented beautifully.

Attached File  coleslaw macerated.jpg   141.57KB   14 downloads
Cole slaw nicely softened.

Attached File  time served.jpg   77.03KB   14 downloads
Dinner is served!

Attached Files



#9 Kanyon71  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 5, 2017 - 11:17 am

Nice job, looks like they came out well.



#10 HanShotFirst  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 7, 2017 - 1:58 pm

Ok. So this place turned me onto the air fryer last year and I love it! Now I’m contemplating an Instant Pot. LOL

I’m Single but when I cook I like to have enough leftovers for a few work (2, maybe 3) lunches so I’m guessing the 6 quart would be ideal for this?

Waiting on the rest of the ads to break before I make my decision but it sounds like a lovely “little gadget” to have. :)

#11 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 7, 2017 - 7:50 pm

One of the 6-quart models should be perfect for what you want. I recommend the Duo, as it has the yogurt function, high and low pressure capability, and most of the recipes around are written for that model.

Even with the recipes, there is a pretty steep learning curve once you start cooking with it. But, if people are interested, I'm willing to help as best I can whenever someone has a question.

Edited by Gator Pam, Nov 7, 2017 - 7:52 pm.


#12 bigjimslade  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 8, 2017 - 8:07 pm

I have one and I love it!

 

here are two people I follow for ideas.....

 

 

https://www.youtube....ingkong5/videos

 

https://www.youtube....qkRFGV22_g3QZFw



#13 bigjimslade  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 8, 2017 - 8:18 pm

I also like this channel as well.

 

https://www.youtube....L8zRSk9lysRdB3w



#14 Tara3117  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 9, 2017 - 12:00 pm

Considering getting an Instant Pot. I currently have a 4 in one, but we mostly only use the slow cooker. It's coating is coming off so it needs to be replaced soon. A few questions...

 

Can you use it with any slow cooker recipe? Will I need to learn all new recipes?

Does it cook on both high and low settings? My current one only cooks on high.

 

I need something super easy. Like, put the stuff in in the morning, press on, have dinner ready when I come home. Is this good for that?


"If Joan of Arc could turn the tide of an entire war before her eighteenth birthday, you can get out of bed." ~ E. Jean Carroll

#15 Suzy Crampton  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 9, 2017 - 4:20 pm

Was looking at the 6qt one for Christmas, now I see that Walmart has a 5qt one in their BF ad. For a family of 4 would the 5qt work? The price is great on it and now wonder if Kohl's will offer a better deal on the 6qt before BF. 


Suzy Chapstick:)

#16 goldie  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 10, 2017 - 3:01 pm

Considering getting an Instant Pot. I currently have a 4 in one, but we mostly only use the slow cooker. It's coating is coming off so it needs to be replaced soon. A few questions...

 

Can you use it with any slow cooker recipe? Will I need to learn all new recipes?

Does it cook on both high and low settings? My current one only cooks on high.

 

I need something super easy. Like, put the stuff in in the morning, press on, have dinner ready when I come home. Is this good for that?

I'm not a big IP user... but what IP is good for is fast cooking. When I cook beef stew, I have to stew it for hours. With IP, I can cook it for 20 mins. 20 mins is a bit deceiving... you have to wait for the pressure to build up, then 20 mins in the set pressure, and then waiting for the pressure to go down. So it takes 40 mins...? That's time saving... so now I can cook beef stew on weekdays.

 

Most of the IP cooking that I saw requires a combination of oven cooking too. I'm not big on multiple 'methods' of cooking. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong. But I still think it's time saving, just that I'm lazy.

 

Somebody need to recommend me a good IP cookbook, please...



#17 giz  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 10, 2017 - 6:08 pm

Looking at the Duo 6 qt. that Kohl's has for $79.99.  Does anyone have any thoughts on the Bella 6 qt. for $49.99. 

 

Haven't made up my mind if I want one.  I have a rice cooker and I like it and thought the instant pot would be more versatile.   Also, thinking of an air fryer...but I have a small kitchen and not enough room for all my gadgets.  ;-)



#18 lakj98  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 11, 2017 - 7:07 am

I have been going back and fourth on if I want to buy an IP or not.  It seems overwhelming with all of the steps.  I like the slow cooker because I can put food in in the morning and it is ready in the evening.  

We have a family of 7.  

Target has 25% off kitchen appliances today so the 8 qt would be right under $100.  Trying to decide if I should order it.



#19 Brad  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 11, 2017 - 2:38 pm

Mini 3-quart Duo down to $52 on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.c...ASIN=B06Y1YD5W7



#20 Rellim1960  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 3:00 pm

I bought the 7 qt IP from Target last year. I got an amazing deal, cartwheel, 5% off with red card, 25% off appliances. Iirc I paid $58. It currently is sitting in the box in the spare room. Completely untouched and unopened, the only problem is the cat decided it’s box makes a dandy scratching post. I just can’t muster up any interest in trying it

Edited by Rellim1960, Nov 12, 2017 - 3:01 pm.


#21 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 4:35 pm

Considering getting an Instant Pot. I currently have a 4 in one, but we mostly only use the slow cooker. It's coating is coming off so it needs to be replaced soon. A few questions...

Can you use it with any slow cooker recipe? Will I need to learn all new recipes?
Does it cook on both high and low settings? My current one only cooks on high.

The Duo and the Ultra models have adjustable low and high settings; the less expensive Lux model does not.

The slow cooker function is iffy on the IP. It has three settings: Low, Medium, and High. The Low setting is more like Warm; it does not cook the food. Medium is supposed to be like Low on crockpots, but users have had mixed results with it. High seems to work, but with longer cooking times than actual slow cookers.

One thing to keep in mind, is that the IP's slow cooker function heats from the bottom only. While there is a nonstick ceramic lined insert available to purchase separately, it is ceramic over aluminum, so it does not retain heat like a crockery insert would.

I need something super easy. Like, put the stuff in in the morning, press on, have dinner ready when I come home. Is this good for that?


It can be, but there is a severe learning curve. You will need to learn the timing for the slow cooker functions and learn new recipes or learn to adapt recipes to learn how to pressure cook. I feel the learning curve is worth it, but others may not.

Was looking at the 6qt one for Christmas, now I see that Walmart has a 5qt one in their BF ad. For a family of 4 would the 5qt work? The price is great on it and now wonder if Kohl's will offer a better deal on the 6qt before BF.


The Walmart 5-quart is the Lux. It has fewer capabilities than the Duo or Lux models.

Considering getting an Instant Pot. I currently have a 4 in one, but we mostly only use the slow cooker. It's coating is coming off so it needs to be replaced soon. A few questions...

Can you use it with any slow cooker recipe? Will I need to learn all new recipes?
Does it cook on both high and low settings? My current one only cooks on high.

The Duo and the Ultra models have adjustable low and high settings; the less expensive Lux model does not.

The slow cooker function is iffy on the IP. It has three settings: Low, Medium, and High. The Low setting is more like Warm; it does not cook the food. Medium is supposed to be like Low on crockpots, but users have had mixed results with it. High seems to work, but with longer cooking times than actual slow cookers.

One thing to keep in mind, is that the IP's slow cooker function heats from the bottom only. While there is a nonstick ceramic lined insert available to purchase separately, it is ceramic over aluminum, so it does not retain heat like a crockery insert would.

I need something super easy. Like, put the stuff in in the morning, press on, have dinner ready when I come home. Is this good for that?


It can be, but there is a severe learning curve. You will need to learn the timing for the slow cooker functions and learn new recipes or learn to adapt recipes to learn how to pressure cook. I feel the learning curve is worth it, but others may not.

Edited by Gator Pam, Nov 12, 2017 - 4:40 pm.


#22 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 5:03 pm

Was looking at the 6qt one for Christmas, now I see that Walmart has a 5qt one in their BF ad. For a family of 4 would the 5qt work? The price is great on it and now wonder if Kohl's will offer a better deal on the 6qt before BF.

The Walmart 5-quart is the Lux. It has fewer capabilities than the Duo or Lux models.
 

I'm not a big IP user... but what IP is good for is fast cooking. When I cook beef stew, I have to stew it for hours. With IP, I can cook it for 20 mins. 20 mins is a bit deceiving... you have to wait for the pressure to build up, then 20 mins in the set pressure, and then waiting for the pressure to go down. So it takes 40 mins...? That's time saving... so now I can cook beef stew on weekdays.

Most of the IP cooking that I saw requires a combination of oven cooking too. I'm not big on multiple 'methods' of cooking. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong. But I still think it's time saving, just that I'm lazy.

The combination recipes involving the oven tend to be for items you want to crisp up after pressurizing, like poultry pieces/whole birds or ribs. Some casserole type dishes may want a crispy top. But things like stews, chili, vegetables, etc., can all be done in the IP, including any sautéing.
 

Somebody need to recommend me a good IP cookbook, please...

Check out the blogs This Old Gal, Twosleevers.com, and Pressure Luck Cooking. Most of the recipes I make come from those. There are a lot of others, as well.

I have heard Bob Warden's (I think that's his name) Good Food Fast is good, and Melissa Clarke of the NYT just put out a cook book for pressure cooking, but I have not seen either one myself.

Edited by Gator Pam, Nov 12, 2017 - 5:08 pm.


#23 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 5:12 pm

Looking at the Duo 6 qt. that Kohl's has for $79.99. Does anyone have any thoughts on the Bella 6 qt. for $49.99.

Haven't made up my mind if I want one. I have a rice cooker and I like it and thought the instant pot would be more versatile. Also, thinking of an air fryer...but I have a small kitchen and not enough room for all my gadgets. ;-)

I think the Bella comes with a Teflon insert which tends to start to peel off over time. The IP comes with a stainless steel insert.

I have been going back and fourth on if I want to buy an IP or not. It seems overwhelming with all of the steps. I like the slow cooker because I can put food in in the morning and it is ready in the evening.
We have a family of 7.
Target has 25% off kitchen appliances today so the 8 qt would be right under $100. Trying to decide if I should order it.

Again, there is an intense learning curve. But, in my opinion, it is definitely worth it.

I bought the 7 qt IP from Target last year. I got an amazing deal, cartwheel, 5% off with red card, 25% off appliances. Iirc I paid $58. It currently is sitting in the box in the spare room. Completely untouched and unopened, the only problem is the cat decided it’s box makes a dandy scratching post. I just can’t muster up any interest in trying it

I'm sorry to hear you have no interest in trying it. I can try to help those who are intimidated by it, or who have questions about how to use it. But I doubt I can instill interest where there isn't any.

#24 biomajor  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 6:47 pm

Hi Pam and Brad, and all :)

Thanks for the reviews. I’ve been debating, but with 8 Crockpots, I’m just not sure :)

#25 giz  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 7:12 pm

I bought the 7 qt IP from Target last year. I got an amazing deal, cartwheel, 5% off with red card, 25% off appliances. Iirc I paid $58. It currently is sitting in the box in the spare room. Completely untouched and unopened, the only problem is the cat decided it’s box makes a dandy scratching post. I just can’t muster up any interest in trying it

That was an amazing deal? Break it open! ;-)

#26 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 12, 2017 - 8:37 pm

Hi Michelle!

I’ve been debating, but with 8 Crockpots, I’m just not sure :)

While the IP supposedly can be used as a slow cooker, it really is a different kettle of fish. Eggs, yogurt, and cheesecake alone make it worthwhile.

Edited by Gator Pam, Nov 12, 2017 - 8:38 pm.


#27 biomajor  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 13, 2017 - 7:23 pm

Maybe, for cheesecake alone. Lol

#28 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 14, 2017 - 11:17 am

Trust me. I've never had hard cooked eggs peel as easily in my life.

#29 Gator Pam  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 25, 2017 - 1:57 pm

So, did anyone get an IP and want to get started using it? Do the water test first! Look up Frieda loves Bread on YouTube, and search for her IP Water Test video. Watch it, and then do the test yourself.

This will familiarize you with the pot, Quick Release, and clean out any potential manufacturing gunk possibly left behind.

If you have any questions regarding using the IP, feel free to ask!

#30 budgetsRsexy  OFFLINE  

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Posted Nov 25, 2017 - 3:23 pm

While the IP supposedly can be used as a slow cooker, it really is a different kettle of fish. Eggs, yogurt, and cheesecake alone make it worthwhile.


Could you please clarify when you say a different kettle of fish? Is it just that it can do so much more or does the slow cooker aspect not really function the same way as a crock pot? I ask because we ordered one to replace 2 separate appliances (crock pot and rice cooker) to save space and also for larger capacity (we upgraded to 6 quarts). I really want to be able to still make my crock pot recipes.

Thanks in advance for your input, it’s greatly appreciated!




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